Will the Internet of Things always be so vulnerable?

The Internet of Things (IoT) has undergone an amazing transformation, from a pipe dream to a marketing buzzword, and now an impending reality. Recent estimates expect the number of internet-connected devices to reach 26 billion by 2020, with some studies suggesting an even higher output. With an exponential increase in devices communicating with us, other devices, and with the internet at large, how can anyone keep private information safe? …

In 2015, more than 165 million personal records were exposed, through cybersecurity breaches over the course of the year. A staggering 64 per cent of Americans have been personally affected by a major data breach. It’s no longer a question of “if” cyber criminals will target you — it’s a matter of “when.”

Cyberattacks have not only become common, they’ve also become exponentially more dangerous, as we connect more and more of our devices to global networks. The large majority of cybersecurity professionals are concerned about the potential weaponisation of IoT, and only 30 per cent of them believe their organisations are fully prepared for the risks inherent in IoT. Furthermore, experts feel only one out of every ten IoT devices has adequate security measures. …

Source: Will the Internet of Things always be so vulnerable?

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Mirai is the hydra of IoT security: too many heads to cut off

Efforts to stop Mirai, a malware found infecting thousands of IoT devices, have become a game of whack-a-mole, with differing opinions over whether hackers or the security community are making any headway.

The malicious code became publicly available in late September. Since then, it’s been blamed for enslaving IoT devices such as DVRs and internet cameras to launch massive distributed denial-of-service attacks, one of which disrupted internet access across the U.S. in October. …

Source: Mirai is the hydra of IoT security: too many heads to cut off | PCWorld

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4 ways cyber attackers may be hacking your IoT devices

Many (too many) of the connected devices that make up the Internet of Things (IoT) are extremely easy to hack. New IoT devices are being designed and released every day — from consumer items, like light bulbs and automobiles to industrial equipment, like drones and entire power plants. But many of these devices are built little-to-no security in place.

“IoT devices are simply computers and can be hacked in any ways that a traditional computer could be hacked,” says Patrick Wardle, director of research for Synack, a cybersecurity company. Even more alarming, because IoT devices are often connected directly to the internet, they can be accessed by attackers all over the world, explained Wardle. …

To know more about what the worst-case IoT security scenarios are, here are a few common ways that attackers are hijacking IoT devices:

  1. Mass vulnerability probing …
  2. Exploiting universal Plug-and-Play (uPNP) …
  3. Intercepting the cellular network …
  4. Reverse-engineering firmware …

Source: 4 ways cyber attackers may be hacking your IoT devices

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