Video: All of the Ways that BlackBerry Software Impacts the Enterprise of Things

From the 60 million cars on the road running BlackBerry software, to the 80+ security certifications we have earned, to the 20,000+ enterprises that rely on our software, BlackBerry secures, connects, and mobilizes businesses all around the world today. Watch this video to learn more.

Source: WhatsApp for BlackBerry 10 support officially extended until the end of 2017

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BlackBerry launches QNX Hypervisor 2.0 to help automakers realize a safe and secure connected car

As the need for more advanced safety and security software rises in the automotive sector, BlackBerry QNX has officially launched QNX Hypervisor 2.0, BlackBerry’s most advanced and secure 64-bit embedded operating system which allows developers to partition and isolate safety-critical environments from non-safety critical environments. …

There is no safety without security, said John Wall, senior vice president and head of BlackBerry QNX. If hackers can access a car through a non-critical ECU system, they can tamper or take over safety-critical areas, such as the steering system, brakes or engine. BlackBerry’s QNX Hypervisor 2.0 safeguards against these types of attacks and is a key component of our multi-level approach to securing connected and autonomous vehicles.

In addition to the launch of QNX Hypervisor 2.0, BlackBerry also announced Qualcomm Technologies has adopted QNX Hypervisor 2.0 as part of certain digital cockpit solutions. Support for QNX Hypervisor 2.0 on the Snapdragon 820Am automotive platform is available today.

The QNX Hypervisor 2.0 will assist automakers in taking greater advantage of the power of our Snapdragon automotive platform,” said Nakul Duggal, vice president, product management, automotive, Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. The ability to run concurrent operating systems on top of the QNX Hypervisor on the Snapdragon 820Am automotive platform will help automakers to reduce hardware complexity and cost in their vehicles, while still delivering the responsive and rich user experiences that consumers demand today.

Download the QNX Hypervisor Product Brief for more information.

Source: BlackBerry launches QNX Hypervisor 2.0 to help automakers realize a safe and secure connected car

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Chinese Fireball malware infects over 250 million PCs worldwide

Security researchers are warning users about a dangerous new form of malware dubbed Fireball that has already infected 250 million computers worldwide.

The malware, dubbed Fireball, was discovered by CheckPoint security and is already present on 20 percent of world’s corporate networks, the company said.

According to security firm CheckPoint, Fireball takes over your internet browser and is capable of launching unauthorised tasks, like downloading files containing even more malware onto your machine.

It can also hijack your web traffic in order to generate fraudulent ad revenue. …

Fireball works by installing a plugin that boosts the advertisements belonging to Rafotech, which generates fraudulent clicks and fake web traffic.

Fireball Global Infection Rates (darker pink = more infections)

India, Brazil and Mexico are the countries with most infections of Fireball and there have also been 5.5 million infections found in the United States. It is not known how many infections are in Thailand but Check Point said there had been some instances of Fireball infecting computers in the kingdom. …

Source: Chinese Fireball malware infects 250 million PCs worldwide – here’s how to check if your PC is infected

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What you need to know about QNX Hypervisor

QNX Hypervisor is a Type 1 realtime priority-based microkernel hypervisor built for managing virtual machines. The QNX Hypervisor makes it easier to obtain and maintain safety certifications by separating safety-critical components from non-safety critical components in separate guest operating systems. The QNX Hypervisor boasts the ability to meet the precision requirement of an embedded zero-downtime production system. …

Source: What you need to know about QNX Hypervisor

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Building a BlackBerry QNX 7 Desktop

Elad Lahav has managed to build a QNX 7 Desktop. In his blog post he describes the challenges to bring that system to work on an ASRock IMB-151 mini ITX board.

BlackBerry QNX officially released version 7 of its Software Development Platform (SDP) last month. This release is the first to support 64-bit architectures, including x86-64 and aarch64. It also brings with it new features and over two years stability fixes.

As is the case for any release of an operating system that is not backwards-compatible with an earlier version, we were faced with the problem of a lack of content for SDP 7. Yes, the code has been thoroughly tested in the lab on a variety of boards and yes, Alpha and Beta versions of the release have been used by our partners to bring up new versions of their systems. Nevertheless, it was felt that a crucial part was missing in the test cycle, that of eating one’s own dog food.

BlackBerry QNX is an embedded operating system targeting applications in the automotive, general embedded, and medical markets. However, it is not your garden-variety embedded OS: QNX is a full-blown, UNIX-like, POSIX-compliant operating system with all of the features you would expect of a desktop or sever-class OS. Compatibility with other systems means that, at least in theory, porting various open source projects to SDP 7 should be a relatively easy task. And so, while there is no official support in this release for a desktop environment, there is nothing precluding someone from building such a system. With that in mind, I set myself the task of building a BlackBerry QNX 7 desktop. …

Source: Building a BlackBerry QNX 7 Desktop

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BlackBerry Supports the Fast-Growing AppConfig Community

At BlackBerry, it has always been their goal to help customers transform their businesses – to help them securely build new workflows, processes, and functionality. App development plays a key role in that transformation. Business transformation requires great applications: tools that both increase productivity and protect critical data while preserving user’s privacy.

Developers can choose to use UEM/EMM software development kits (SDKs) to integrate key security and usability capabilities, like those provided by BlackBerry Dynamics. SDKs fill key gaps between native frameworks and what customers and regulated environment demand, particularly for un-managed devices. Developers can also choose, with device deployments that are managed by MDM, to leverage OS level capabilities.

These deployments are focused on native OS controls around:

  • Configuring apps through managed app config
  • Preventing data loss through managed open in
  • Connecting apps securely through per-app VPN

Here’s where the AppConfig community comes in. Launched in February 2016, its purpose was simple: to simplify application development and deployment, and accelerate adoption. By establishing a common approach based on native operating systems, it allows development teams to create configuration policies for applications that work consistently across multiple platforms. As an EMM member of AppConfig, BlackBerry can support customers that want to deploy apps that embrace the AppConfig approach. …

Source: BlackBerry Supports the Fast-Growing AppConfig Community

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BlackBerry Privacy Shade Sees a Copycat App With Added Risks

Last month BlackBerry released a new app for Android called BlackBerry Privacy Shade. Privacy Shade is a great app for hiding the majority of your screen from prying eyes while allowing a small viewing area that you can easily move around showing you only the content that you need to see.

It was pointed out today by one of our staff that there is almost an identical app to BlackBerry’s Privacy Shade in the Google Play Store. So I decided to take a look at the app called Privacy Screen Guard and Filter …

Now, Privacy Screen Guard and Filter looks very similar to BlackBerry’s Privacy Shade app with a few little differences. …

BlackBerry Privacy app doesn’t require any permissions other than “Run at start up” and “Draw Over Other Apps.” This is pretty much required for the app to work. …

Now take a look at the permissions for Privacy Screen Guard :

You will see that it is asking for access to the telephone to read phone status and identity, also to reroute outgoing calls. …

So why is it asking for permission to reroute outgoing calls??? This instantly raises a red flag to me, because when using BlackBerry Privacy Shade and a call comes in, there is a notification at the top of of the screen, it is not “blocking the floating notification” …

Now what about the other permissions requested by Privacy Screen Guard:

Other
  • receive data from Internet
  • view network connections
  • full network access
  • draw over other apps
  • prevent device from sleeping

Just what data does it need to receive from the Internet? Why does it need full network access and to view network connections? Prevent device from sleeping??

This app also refuses to work unless you grant it the permission to access your phone. You cannot turn the permission off and still use it, it shuts down.

While this seems like a great app, and a good alternative to BlackBerry Privacy Shade, are you willing to give this app the permissions it requests? I’m certainly not willing to risk my privacy that’s for sure!!

This is just one example of an app with suspect permissions. There are hundreds, if not thousands out there. …

Source: BlackBerry Privacy Shade Sees a Copycat App With Added Risks. – UTB Blogs

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AMD’s Open Source Deep Learning Strategy

… Deep learning (DL) is a technology that is as revolutionary as the Internet and mobile computing that came before it. One author found it so revolutionary that he described it as “The Last Invention of Man” [KHAT] – strong words indeed!

Currently, the revival of interest in all things “Artificial Intelligence” (AI) is primarily due to the spectacular results achieved with deep learning research.  I must however emphasize that this revival is not due to other classical AI technologies like expert systems, semantic knowledge bases, logic programming or Bayesian systems. Most of classical AI has not changed much, if any, in the last 5 years. The recent quantum leap has solely been driven by deep learning successes. …

Deep learning is a disruptive technology like the Internet and mobile computing that came before. Open source software has been the dominant platform that has enabled these technologies.

AMD combines these powerful principles with its open source ROCm initiative. On its own, this definitely has the potential of accelerating deep learning development. ROCm provides a comprehensive set of components that address the high performance computing needs, such as providing tools that are closer to the metal.  These include hand-tuned libraries and support for assembly language tooling.

Future deep learning software will demand even greater optimizations that span many kinds of computing cores. In my view, AMD’s strategic vision of investing heavily in heterogeneous system architectures gives their platform a distinct edge.

AMD’s open source strategy is uniquely positioned to disrupt and take the lead in future deep learning developments.

Source: The Potential Disruptiveness of AMD’s Open Source Deep Learning Strategy

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Samsung’s Android Replacement Is a Hacker’s Dream

A security researcher has found 40 unknown zero-day vulnerabilities in Tizen, the operating system that runs on millions of Samsung products.

Last month, the CIA got a lot of attention when WikiLeaks published internal documents purporting to show how the spy agency can monitor people through their Samsung smart TVs. There was a caveat to the hack, however—the hijack involved older models of Samsung TVs and required the CIA have physical access to a TV to install the malware via a USB stick.

But the window to this sort of hijacking is far wider than originally thought because a researcher in Israel has uncovered 40 unknown vulnerabilities, or zero-days, that would allow someone to remotely hack millions of newer Samsung smart TVs, smart watches, and mobile phones already on the market, as well as ones slated for future release, without needing physical access to them. The security holes are in an open-source operating system called Tizen that Samsung has been rolling out in its devices over the last few years. …

Source: Samsung’s Android Replacement Is a Hacker’s Dream

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